The Trump Administration was repeatedly threatening to cut off funding for cost-sharing reductions, and that issue wasn't resolved until October, when the funding was officially eliminated (insurers in most states have added the cost of CSR to silver plan premiums, which although it drives up average premiums, also results in larger premium subsidies and more affordable after-subsidy premiums for many enrollees).

Background: Craniosynostoses are congenital defects in the construction of the skull involving premature fusion of one or more cranial sutures. Premature fusion of sutures causes characteristic skull deformation(s). This affect the structure and thus the appearance of the entire head and face. The aim of this study was to analyze parents’ subjective assessments of head and facial appearance in children with craniosynostoses before and after surgery. Parents also assessed the interpersonal relationship of their children with peers and adults (after surgery). Methods: This study was conducted among parents of 230 children treated in Poland, in two multidisciplinary centers. Detailed statistical analysis was conducted among children who had undergone surgery. Independent variables were age (at survey) of the child (three years and less, four years, and five years and more) and type of craniosynostosis (isolated and syndromic). A chi-square independence test was used. Data was collected using surveys. Results: In the opinion of most parents, the appearance of their child’s head and face after surgery did not differ or differed only slightly from that of their peers. The results of subjective assessment of appearance of children’s face and head after reconstructive treatment remains comparable in three subgroups of patients according to the age. It seems that specific head shape according to the type of craniosynostosis does not have an impact on relations with peers and adults. Conclusion: Surgical treatment of children with craniosynostoses improves the appearance of their head and face. This improvement seems not to depend on the type of isolated craniosynostosis, and is constant over time. Full article
Background: Raising awareness of holistic health and safety among older adults is critical to enhancing their wellbeing in many cases, improving health outcomes and motivating positive behavioral changes. Age-Tastic! is a comprehensive health and safety promotion intervention that uses the concept of a competitive board game to entice older adults to participate and stay engaged. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of Age-Tastic! on the level of awareness, health literacy, self-efficacy and positive behavioral change among the participants. Methods: A randomized control trial was conducted with 98 older adults assigned to an experimental and control group. Interviews were conducted at baseline, right after the eight-week intervention ended and again eight weeks after the end of the intervention. Results: The results showed significant increases among experimental group participants in knowledge about health, self-efficacy and behavioral change in the areas of nutrition, financial exploitation, health literacy and emotional well-being. Discussion: Implications for replication and engagement are discussed. Full article
The health care industry incorporates several sectors that are dedicated to providing health care services and products. As a basic framework for defining the sector, the United Nations' International Standard Industrial Classification categorizes health care as generally consisting of hospital activities, medical and dental practice activities, and "other human health activities." The last class involves activities of, or under the supervision of, nurses, midwives, physiotherapists, scientific or diagnostic laboratories, pathology clinics, residential health facilities, patient advocates[18] or other allied health professions.

The ACA’s individual mandate penalty will be set to $0 starting in January 2019. People who are uninsured in 2018 (and not eligible for a penalty exemption) will still have to pay a penalty when they file their 2018 tax return in early 2019. But people who are uninsured in 2019 and beyond will not face a penalty, unless they’re in a state that imposes its own individual mandate.

For starters, the vast majority of the headlines you're seeing are for health insurance that people buy in the individual market. That can be in the health insurance exchange or outside the exchange (i.e., purchased directly from the health insurance company), but it does not include coverage that people get from an employer, nor does it include Medicare, Medicaid, or the Children's Health Insurance Program.
Young adulthood is a period of transition, which for many includes higher education. Higher education is associated with specific risks to wellbeing. Understanding the available data on wellbeing in this group may help inform the future collection of data to inform policy and practice in the sector. This scoping review aimed to identify the availability of data sources on the wellbeing of the Australian young adult population who are attending tertiary education. Using the methods of Arksey and O’Malley, data from three primary sources, i.e., Australian Bureau of Statistics, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare and relevant longitudinal studies, were identified. Data sources were screened and coded, and relevant information was extracted. Key data for eight areas related to wellbeing, namely, family and community, health, education and training, work, economic wellbeing, housing, crime and justice, and culture and leisure sources were identified. Forty individual data sets from 16 surveys and six active longitudinal studies were identified. Two data sets contained seven of the areas of wellbeing, of which one was specific to young adults in tertiary education, while the other survey was not limited to young adults. Both data sets lacked information concerning crime and justice variables, which have recently been identified as being of major concern among Australian university students. We recommend that government policy address the collection of a comprehensive data set encompassing each of the eight areas of wellbeing to inform future policy and practice. Full article
The Australian government announced in May 2008 that it proposes to increase the thresholds, to $100,000 for singles and $150,000 for families. These changes require legislative approval. A bill to change the law has been introduced but was not passed by the Senate.[12] An amended version was passed on 16 October 2008. There have been criticisms that the changes will cause many people to drop their private health insurance, causing a further burden on the public hospital system, and a rise in premiums for those who stay with the private system. Other commentators believe the effect will be minimal.[13]
Louise Norris is an individual health insurance broker who has been writing about health insurance and health reform since 2006. She has written dozens of opinions and educational pieces about the Affordable Care Act for healthinsurance.org. Her state health exchange updates are regularly cited by media who cover health reform and by other health insurance experts.
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