If you are interested in employment at one of Costco's new locations that is still under construction, you should be able to apply online approximately 12 weeks prior to opening. Click on the link above, enter the nearest postal zip code to that location, and look for the listing. If the location is not listed, then the site is not yet accepting applications. We appreciate your interest and patience.
Robert X. Cringely, author of Accidental Empires and creator of the documentaries Triumph of the Nerds and Steve Jobs: The Lost Interview, argues that "the film is beautifully shot and Kutcher's portrayal of Jobs, while not spot-on, is pretty darned good. He certainly has the look down and the walk. But Ashton Kutcher also produced this film and he's definitely a better actor than producer. There are a lot of historical inaccuracies that just don't have to be there. ... The great failing of this film is the same failing as with Walter Isaacson's book: something happened during Steve's NeXT years (which occupy less than 60 seconds of this 122 minute film) that turned Jobs from a brat into a leader, but they don't bother to cover that."[23] Mick LaSalle of the San Francisco Chronicle states that "at its best, it's a good picture, and at its worst, it's almost good."[24] Peter Travers of Rolling Stone suggests that "Kutcher nails the genius and narcissism. It's a quietly dazzling performance" but also notes that "Jobs is a one-man show that needed to go for broke and doesn't. My guess is that Jobs would give it a swat."[25] Contributor for rogerebert.com, Susan Wloszczyna, gave the movie 2/4 stars, saying that, "Rather than attempting a deeper plunge behind the whys and wherefores of the elite business-model gospel according to Apple Inc. guru Steve Jobs and – more importantly – what it says about our culture, the filmmakers follow the easy rise-fall-rise-again blueprint familiar to anyone who has seen an episode of VH1's Behind the Music."[26] She further discusses how Kutcher's performance and the overall movie failed to portray Jobs in iconic manner that current pop culture suggests even after Jobs' passing. In a movie review for The New York Times, writer Manohla Dargis writes that Jobs was "inevitably unsatisfying"[27] and a result of a poor performance of the filmmakers rather than the actors themselves.

According to Cactus, another benefit of offering flexible options is improved employee retention. “In-house employees who relocate to other cities or countries for personal reasons no longer need to quit; they just telecommute,” says Rosari. “In fact, the introduction of remote and flexible work options even brought back a number of our former employees as contractors or freelancers.”

The Real Economic Opportunities of Middle-Skill Work - This report studies the career advancement prospects of people entering middle-skill jobs through the unprecedented analysis of nearly 4 million resumes of middle-skill jobseekers. It highlights the types of occupations that offer the strongest opportunities for financial stability and true economic advancement.


“Since 2000 I’ve been focused on developing spoken language and machine translation systems that can engage with humans more effectively, and hopefully break down language and other barriers,” Chao says. “We’re still far from systems that truly understand the meaning of what we’re saying, but the progress we’re making with Alexa is incredibly exciting.”
×