Merchandising is the lifeblood of Costco, and our business is centered on our warehouse operations. Most employees begin their careers in the warehouse setting, becoming experts in Costco merchandising and operations. The company also offers diverse career opportunities at our Home and Regional Offices in many other areas, such as Accounting, Buying, Marketing, Journalism, Information Systems, and Human Resources, to name a few. Additionally, Costco is dedicated to recognizing and rewarding employees for their hard work and loyalty. In fact, the majority of our management teams are promoted from within.


Costco is committed to promoting from within the company. The majority of our current home and regional office team members are home grown. This means that they started in our warehouses, depots and business centers, learned the business and moved up within the company. This philosophy also ensures promotional opportunities for motivated individuals.

Two years later, Jobs is back in Los Altos, California living at home with his adoptive parents Paul (John Getz) and Clara (Lesley Ann Warren). He is working for Atari and develops a partnership with his friend Steve Wozniak (Josh Gad) after he sees that Wozniak has built a personal computer (the Apple I). They name their new company Apple Computer, though there already is a company called Apple Records that is owned by The Beatles (Wozniak then teases Jobs that this is symbolic of his preference for Bob Dylan). Wozniak gives a demonstration of the Apple I at the Homebrew Computer Club. Jobs is later approached by Paul Terrell (Brad William Henke) who shows interest in the Apple I. Knowing that he and Wozniak will need a studio in which to build them, Jobs convinces his father Paul to allow them to use the family garage (set up as a carpentry/tool center) for his new company. Realizing that they cannot build these computers alone, Jobs also recruits Kottke, Bill Fernandez (Victor Rasuk), and Chris Espinosa (Eddie Hassell) to the Apple team.[7]


The expression day job is often used for a job one works in order to make ends meet while performing low-paying (or non-paying) work in their preferred vocation. Archetypal examples of this are the woman who works as a waitress (her day job) while she tries to become an actress, and the professional athlete who works as a laborer in the off season because he is currently only able to make the roster of a semi-professional team.
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