North Carolina State Government is the state’s largest employer with over 81,016 employees all working toward a common goal of making North Carolina great. We are a large organization comprised of various agencies, branches, and universities, each providing an important public service. Careers within the State of North Carolina include public safety, education, transportation, and health care. To meet its needs, the State values skilled, hard-working employees from various educational and experience backgrounds.
The Real Economic Opportunities of Middle-Skill Work - This report studies the career advancement prospects of people entering middle-skill jobs through the unprecedented analysis of nearly 4 million resumes of middle-skill jobseekers. It highlights the types of occupations that offer the strongest opportunities for financial stability and true economic advancement.
Robert X. Cringely, author of Accidental Empires and creator of the documentaries Triumph of the Nerds and Steve Jobs: The Lost Interview, argues that "the film is beautifully shot and Kutcher's portrayal of Jobs, while not spot-on, is pretty darned good. He certainly has the look down and the walk. But Ashton Kutcher also produced this film and he's definitely a better actor than producer. There are a lot of historical inaccuracies that just don't have to be there. ... The great failing of this film is the same failing as with Walter Isaacson's book: something happened during Steve's NeXT years (which occupy less than 60 seconds of this 122 minute film) that turned Jobs from a brat into a leader, but they don't bother to cover that."[23] Mick LaSalle of the San Francisco Chronicle states that "at its best, it's a good picture, and at its worst, it's almost good."[24] Peter Travers of Rolling Stone suggests that "Kutcher nails the genius and narcissism. It's a quietly dazzling performance" but also notes that "Jobs is a one-man show that needed to go for broke and doesn't. My guess is that Jobs would give it a swat."[25] Contributor for rogerebert.com, Susan Wloszczyna, gave the movie 2/4 stars, saying that, "Rather than attempting a deeper plunge behind the whys and wherefores of the elite business-model gospel according to Apple Inc. guru Steve Jobs and – more importantly – what it says about our culture, the filmmakers follow the easy rise-fall-rise-again blueprint familiar to anyone who has seen an episode of VH1's Behind the Music."[26] She further discusses how Kutcher's performance and the overall movie failed to portray Jobs in iconic manner that current pop culture suggests even after Jobs' passing. In a movie review for The New York Times, writer Manohla Dargis writes that Jobs was "inevitably unsatisfying"[27] and a result of a poor performance of the filmmakers rather than the actors themselves.
The film jumps forward to 1996. Jobs is married to Laurene Powell Jobs (Abby Brammell) and has accepted Lisa (Annika Bertea) as his daughter (she now lives with them). He has a son, Reed (Paul Baretto) and is also running the company NeXT which Apple decides to buy. He is asked by then-CEO Gil Amelio to return to Apple as a consultant. Jobs does so and soon he is named the new CEO, ultimately firing Amelio and his ex-friend Markkula (who refused to support him when he was forced out of Apple 11 years prior). Jobs becomes interested in the work of Jony Ive (Giles Matthey) and works to reinvent Apple. The film ends with Jobs recording the dialogue for the Think Different commercial in 1997. Before the credits, there are original photos of all the main characters paired with clips from the film of the actor playing the part, plus a dedication to Steve Jobs.
If you’re a woman looking for an apprenticeship in the field of construction, transportation, or protective services, check out the Women Build, Protect & Move America portal. You’ll find resources for local and nationwide apprenticeships as well as information about the different jobs in each field, professional trade organizations, and your rights on the job.
With state employees located in each one of the 100 counties in North Carolina, careers in state government are available from the mountains to the coast and all points in between. Our metropolitan areas are consistently ranked by media publications as thriving centers for businesses, career seekers, education, and social life. The University of North Carolina system consists of colleges and universities that consistently receive top honors in various categories.
We expect employees to be honest, trustworthy, and operate with integrity. Discrimination and all unlawful harassment (including sexual harassment) in employment is not tolerated. We encourage success based on our individual merits and abilities without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, disability, marital status, citizenship status, military status, protected veteran status or employment status. We support and obey laws that prohibit discrimination everywhere we do business. AT&T fully considers all qualified applicants including those with a criminal history. Click here to learn more or request an application accommodation here.
Merchandising is the lifeblood of Costco, and our business is centered on our warehouse operations. Most employees begin their careers in the warehouse setting, becoming experts in Costco merchandising and operations. The company also offers diverse career opportunities at our Home and Regional Offices in many other areas, such as Accounting, Buying, Marketing, Journalism, Information Systems, and Human Resources, to name a few. Additionally, Costco is dedicated to recognizing and rewarding employees for their hard work and loyalty. In fact, the majority of our management teams are promoted from within.

The expression day job is often used for a job one works in order to make ends meet while performing low-paying (or non-paying) work in their preferred vocation. Archetypal examples of this are the woman who works as a waitress (her day job) while she tries to become an actress, and the professional athlete who works as a laborer in the off season because he is currently only able to make the roster of a semi-professional team.
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