Production began in June 2012 at Jobs' childhood home in Los Altos, California, with the help of Jobs' stepmother, Marilyn Jobs (who still lives there).[10] It was also observed by his sister Patricia.[11] UCLA was used as the backdrop for Jobs' time at Reed College.[12] The majority of the film was shot in the Los Angeles region.[8][13] Russell Carpenter was the cinematographer.[14]
Jason represents a great example of the opportunity that accompanies working at White Castle. Originally working in one of our manufacturing plants, Jason successfully transitioned into a support role in our Supply Chain Management Department at our Home Office. While he keeps a relatively low profile, he’s always visible pounding the pavement after work. Summer heat, wind, rain and snow, Jason runs nearly every day and says, “You just gotta do it.” As a Boston Marathon qualifier thanks to his impressive performance in several regional marathons, Jason applies the same ethic to his physical workouts as he does to learning and growing his professional knowledge.
On the top of the FlexJobs list is the company Cactus, a global medical communications agency that began offering remote work opportunities in 2007. “We quickly realized that it is beneficial for everyone concerned,” says Daniel Rosario, AVP of editorial talent acquisition. “Job seekers now have a much wider variety of options and can focus on what they do best; the company, in turn, has access to an expanded talent pool; and our clients — mainly research scientists — are assured of having their documents edited or translated by the right expert.”
Robert X. Cringely, author of Accidental Empires and creator of the documentaries Triumph of the Nerds and Steve Jobs: The Lost Interview, argues that "the film is beautifully shot and Kutcher's portrayal of Jobs, while not spot-on, is pretty darned good. He certainly has the look down and the walk. But Ashton Kutcher also produced this film and he's definitely a better actor than producer. There are a lot of historical inaccuracies that just don't have to be there. ... The great failing of this film is the same failing as with Walter Isaacson's book: something happened during Steve's NeXT years (which occupy less than 60 seconds of this 122 minute film) that turned Jobs from a brat into a leader, but they don't bother to cover that."[23] Mick LaSalle of the San Francisco Chronicle states that "at its best, it's a good picture, and at its worst, it's almost good."[24] Peter Travers of Rolling Stone suggests that "Kutcher nails the genius and narcissism. It's a quietly dazzling performance" but also notes that "Jobs is a one-man show that needed to go for broke and doesn't. My guess is that Jobs would give it a swat."[25] Contributor for rogerebert.com, Susan Wloszczyna, gave the movie 2/4 stars, saying that, "Rather than attempting a deeper plunge behind the whys and wherefores of the elite business-model gospel according to Apple Inc. guru Steve Jobs and – more importantly – what it says about our culture, the filmmakers follow the easy rise-fall-rise-again blueprint familiar to anyone who has seen an episode of VH1's Behind the Music."[26] She further discusses how Kutcher's performance and the overall movie failed to portray Jobs in iconic manner that current pop culture suggests even after Jobs' passing. In a movie review for The New York Times, writer Manohla Dargis writes that Jobs was "inevitably unsatisfying"[27] and a result of a poor performance of the filmmakers rather than the actors themselves.

You are leaving the McDonald's Corporation web site for a site that is controlled by a third party, not affiliated with McDonald's. The content and policies, including the privacy policy, on the site you are entering may vary from McDonald's viewpoints and policies. Please be sure to review the policies of every site you visit. McDonald's is not responsible for the opinions, policies, statements or practices of any other companies, such as those that may be expressed in the web site you are entering.


Care.com does not employ any care provider or care seeker nor is it responsible for the conduct of any care provider or care seeker. Care.com provides information and tools to help care seekers and care providers connect and make informed decisions. However, each individual is solely responsible for selecting an appropriate care provider or care seeker for themselves or their families and for complying with all applicable laws in connection with any employment relationship they establish. The information contained in member profiles, job posts and applications are supplied by care providers and care seekers themselves and is not information generated or verified by Care.com. Care.com does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment or engage in any conduct that requires a professional license.
Getting a first job is an important rite of passage in many cultures. The youth may start by doing household work, odd jobs, or working for a family business. In many countries, school children get summer jobs during the longer summer vacation. Students enrolled in higher education can apply for internships or coops to further enhance the probability of securing an entry level job upon graduation.
×